4 Notes

destinyjade00:

This.

Buzzfeed turns the tables on a couple of recent ads in this amusing video. Check it out.

By re-imagining these videos, and replacing the hyper-sexualized female actors with male actors, it’s even more apparent (to those who can’t ALREADY see how absurd these ads are in their original forms) that this kind of advertising is kind of, well, dumb. Not to mention the social repercussions of the continual objectification of women by the media.

The idea that “sex sells” is super outdated- as like this are unoriginal and reveal a serious lack of creativity.

Tweet us @breakthrough and tell us what you think!

-Mihika

105065 Notes

3 Notes

mslopez9:

Today is Malala Day. Lets all honor this incredibly courageous and admirable young woman.She is my inspiration and will always and forever be in my heart.

mslopez9:

Today is Malala Day. Lets all honor this incredibly courageous and admirable young woman.She is my inspiration and will always and forever be in my heart.

84 Notes

halftheskymovement:

Today is Malala Day, a chance to celebrate and advocate for girls’ education. Malala Fund is working to provide access to education for girls in Nigeria, Pakistan, Kenya and Jordan. Show your support by telling everybody what you are #StrongerThan, and learn more at http://www.malala.org/ 

halftheskymovement:

Today is Malala Day, a chance to celebrate and advocate for girls’ education. Malala Fund is working to provide access to education for girls in Nigeria, Pakistan, Kenya and Jordan. Show your support by telling everybody what you are #StrongerThan, and learn more at http://www.malala.org/ 

1392 Notes

usengageun:

Today is Malala Day! Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani blogger who drew global attention after the Taliban shot her in the head for advocating girls’ education, is celebrated her 17th birthday yesterday. Please join us in raising your voice for girls worldwide: http://uni.cf/GS14 #GirlSummit UNICEF

usengageun:

Today is Malala Day! Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani blogger who drew global attention after the Taliban shot her in the head for advocating girls’ education, is celebrated her 17th birthday yesterday. 

Please join us in raising your voice for girls worldwide: http://uni.cf/GS14 #GirlSummit UNICEF

2 Notes

Pretty awesome, don’t you think?!
From Policy Mic:

Enter Adam Nathaniel Peck, a deputy digital editor at the Center for American Progress’s ThinkProgress, who went into a Hobby Lobby store yesterday and used the company’s products to send a very powerful message…

Pretty awesome, don’t you think?!

From Policy Mic:

Enter Adam Nathaniel Peck, a deputy digital editor at the Center for American Progress’s ThinkProgress, who went into a Hobby Lobby store yesterday and used the company’s products to send a very powerful message…

Notes

image 

Hello! I am Brenna Foster, the new Communications Associate at Breakthrough. I am thrilled to join such an exciting team of innovative and diverse people. I’ve worked as a communications professional at several non-profits in the US and across Asia, most recently in Seoul, South Korea, leaving me with a deep appreciation for kimchi and K-pop. I can’t wait to dive into social campaigns with Breakthrough and become a part of this amazing community!

31 Notes

plannedparenthoodteens:

The Supreme Court just ruled that bosses can deny employees coverage of birth control. This is a major FAIL for American women and their families. Bosses of private, for-profit businesses should not be able to interfere in women’s health decisions. The decision to use birth control is between a woman and her doctor, not her boss.
This isn’t over. We’re not going to let a handful of extreme bosses & politicians turn back the clock—we’re moving forward, not backward. 
 #NotMyBossBusiness
Learn more: http://huff.to/1x5d6eS

plannedparenthoodteens:

The Supreme Court just ruled that bosses can deny employees coverage of birth control. This is a major FAIL for American women and their families. Bosses of private, for-profit businesses should not be able to interfere in women’s health decisions. The decision to use birth control is between a woman and her doctor, not her boss.

This isn’t over. We’re not going to let a handful of extreme bosses & politicians turn back the clock—we’re moving forward, not backward. 

 #NotMyBossBusiness

Learn more: http://huff.to/1x5d6eS

504 Notes

ourtimeorg:

Wise words from John Oliver in response to today’s Supreme Court decision, which ruled that employers can deny female employees access to the new birth control benefits of the Affordable Care Act

ourtimeorg:

Wise words from John Oliver in response to today’s Supreme Court decision, which ruled that employers can deny female employees access to the new birth control benefits of the Affordable Care Act

Notes

Title IX: How a Good Law Went Terribly… Right!

Title IX, the legislation that allowed women to be able to play varsity sports in high school and college with the same freedom and funding as men (and attempted to end the systematic marginalization of female athletes) celebrates its 42nd anniversary this week. Yet some still maintain that Title IX has done more harm than it has good, and is to blame for the gradual “devastation” of men’s sports over the past four decades.

I beg to differ. Even today, over forty years after Title IX, female athletes aren’t seen in the same light as male athletes. People don’t watch women’s sports with the same fascination and awe that they do men’s sports. Women’s athletics is painfully devoid of the universal prestige every male athlete commands, despite the parallels in effort and skill that female athletes demonstrate in their athletic endeavors. The lack of glitz and glamor of women’s athletics drives many women away from the seemingly endless hours of practice, perseverance, and pressure that come with even college level athletics. I have had countless girl friends quit their sports without so much as an eyebrow raised by their peers and parents, yet when a boy of the same skill level chooses to quit a sport, he is often seen as weak or uncommitted.

It is the societal rejection of the inspiring awe that is female athletes that means that most girls realize that somewhere along the line, society does not encourage girls to excel athletically and would much rather see them on the sidelines, half-naked and cheerleading, than see them playing on the field. Even today, forty years after Title IX, female athletes aren’t seen in the same light as male athletes, but that will never change unless there is a huge movement to promote and encourage girls to participate the same way we do boys. Without Title IX, girls who brimmed with athletic potential would be forced to stay on club teams and never be able to achieve their full athletic potential on a varsity or professional level— many of the resources to fund female sports would be siphoned to men’s sports.

Women’s sports have made huge strides since 1972, but without the constant upholding and defense of legislation like Title IX, that progress would come to a grinding halt. Men’s sports will carry on. The culture of male athletics is so ingrained within the fabric of this country that it is impossible for them not to. What is forever at risk is girls’ sports- without Title IX, chances are many schools would have to cut most funding for women’s sports solely based on the fact that they don’t generate the same revenue that men’s sports and women would lose their opportunity to excel in something that they are passionate about.

So let’s all go out and celebrate the 42nd anniversary of Title IX by watching some women’s sports this week, and marvel in their athletic prowess!

-Kara

 

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